African Press International (API)

"Daily Online News Channel".

Archive for July 9th, 2012

DJ. NELSHINE: Hots up Massawa bar in Oslo-Norway with Hiphop, Reggae, Pop and African Music

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

  • By Kip-korir – Chief editor/API 

Sunday evening outing in Oslo-Norway is normally dull, because many bars and clubs have few visitors. Massawa bar has, however, changed all that by having DJ Nelshine whose origin is Benin, Nigeria.

Preparing himself to hot up the place:

www.africanpress.me/ DJ. Nelshine preparing his machines in readiness to play at Massawa in Oslo

http://www.africanpress.me/ DJ. Nelshine preparing his machines in readiness to play at Massawa in Oslo

He plays music during the week in Massawa, but his style of DJ-ing has changed the face of a Sunday outing in Oslo. The place which used to have few customers on Sundays, is now fully packed with customers dancing the night out until 03.00AM in the morning.

The place assembles people from all cultures who mingle freely chatting and when music starts, all is changed and they start shaking hot singly or with a partner.

Ready to hot up the place:

www.africanpress.me/ DJ. Nelshine at work preparing to entertain customers in Massawa Oslo Norway.

http://www.africanpress.me/ DJ. Nelshine at work preparing to entertain customers in Massawa Oslo Norway.

Although the DJ is a soft-spoken guy, when you chat with him, you discover his enthusiasm in music and will not take you long to realise that music is his passion. DJ Nelshine hots up the place at 21.00PM and by 23.00PM the place is fully packed to capacity.

African Press International visited the place – Massawa, this past Sunday where we had a chat with DJ-Nelshine, before he started warming up the place with music, and we were immediately lost for words as we got impacted by the cheerful customers all over the place shaking their bottoms-up whenever they got the opportunity and space.

For sure, the DJ has given and continues to give the people in Oslo who are lovers of Hiphop, reggae, Pop and African Music a good time.

Entertaining customers in Massawa, Oslo-Norway Sunday the 8th.July 2012:

DJ Nelshine has been DJ-ing for 10 years, 5 of this in European countries. He also has 3 years experience as DJ from his homeland, Nigeria.

DJ Nelshine tells API that although he is very busy with his work, he dedicates Sunday afternoons to communicate through Dj.nelshine@europe.com with friends who love his style of DJ-ing. This, he says, gives him comfort, because he believes that it is wise to keep good contact with friends even if one is a busy person.

End

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

ICC Kenyan cases – Trials to start on 10 and 11 April 2013.

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

Now it is clear that the Kenyan cases will not be referred back to Kenya or East African Court. The trial dates has been set by the International Criminal Court in the Hague.

According to the ICC press release, Kenyan situation: Trials to start on 10 and 11 April 2013

Today, 9 July 2012, Trial Chamber V of the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued scheduling orders setting the dates for the commencement of the trials in the two Kenyan cases, The Prosecutor v. William Samoei Ruto and Joshua Arap Sang and The Prosecutor v. Francis Kirimi Muthaura and Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, respectively on 10 and 11 April 2013, establishing a time table for the various procedural steps required to be undertaken before the opening of the trials to guarantee the fairness of the procedures.

Background

On 31 March 2010, Pre-Trial Chamber II granted the Prosecutor’s request to open an investigation proprio motu in the situation in Kenya, State Party since 2005. Following summonses to appear issued on 8 March 2011 in two separate cases, six Kenyan citizens voluntarily appeared before Pre-Trial Chamber II on 7 and 8 April 2011. The confirmation of charges hearings in the two cases took place from 1 to 9 September 2011, and 21 September to 5 October 2011, respectively. On 23 January 2012, the judges declined to confirm the charges against Henry Kiprono Kosgey and Mohammed Hussein Ali. Pre-Trial Chamber II confirmed the charges against William Samoei Ruto, Joshua Arap Sang, Francis Kirimi Muthaura and Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta and committed them to trial. On 29 March 2012, the ICC Presidency constituted Trial Chamber V and referred to it the two cases.

Case nr 1: Ruto and Sang

William Samoei Ruto

William Samoei Ruto Former Minister of Higher Education, Science and technology of the Republic of Kenya
Summonses to appear issued: 8 March 2011
Initial appearance hearing: 7 April 2011
Confirmation of charges hearing: 1 to 8 September 2011
Decision on the confirmation of charges: 23 January 2012
Charges

Mr Ruto is accused of being criminally responsible as an indirect co-perpetrator pursuant to article 25(3)(a) of the Rome Statute for the crimes against humanity of:

  • murder (article 7(l)(a));
  • deportation or forcible transfer of population (article 7(l)(d)); and
  • persecution (article 7(l)(h)).

 

Joshua Arap Sang

Joshua Arap Sang Head of operations at Kass FM in Nairobi, the Republic of Kenya
Summonses to appear issued: 8 March 2011
Initial appearance hearing: 7 April 2011
Confirmation of charges hearing: 1 to 8 September 2011
Decision on the confirmation of charges: 23 January 2012
Charges

Pre-Trial Chamber II found that there are no substantial grounds to believe that Mr Sang is an indirect co-perpetrator, because his contribution to the commission of the crimes was not essential. Instead, Mr Sang is accused of having otherwise contributed (within the meaning of article 25(3)(d) of the Rome Statute) to the commission of the following crimes against humanity:

  • murder (article 7(l)(a));
  • deportation or forcible transfer of population (article 7(l)(d)); and
  • persecution (article 7(l)(h)).

Case nr 2: Uhuru and Muthaura

Francis Kirimi Muthaura

Francis Kirimi Muthaura Former Head of the Public Service and Secretary to the Cabinet of the Republic of Kenya
Summonses to appear issued: 8 March 2011
Initial appearance hearing: 8 April 2011
Confirmation of charges hearing: 21 September to 5 October 2011
Decision on the confirmation of charges: 23 January 2012
Charges

Mr Muthaura – together with Mr Kenyatta – is allegedly criminally responsible as an indirect co-perpetrator pursuant to article 25(3)(a) of the Rome Statute for the crimes against humanity of:

  • murder (article 7(l)(a));
  • deportation or forcible transfer (article 7(l)(d));
  • rape (article 7(l)(g));
  • persecution (article 7(l)(h)); and
  • other inhumane acts (article 7(l)(k)).

 

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta Deputy Prime Minister and former Minister for Finance of the Republic of Kenya
Summonses to appear issued: 8 March 2011
Initial appearance hearing: 8 April 2011
Confirmation of charges hearing: 21 September to 5 October 2011
Decision on the confirmation of charges: 23 January 2012
Charges

Mr Kenyatta – together with Mr Muthaura – is allegedly criminally responsible as an indirect co-perpetrator pursuant to article 25(3)(a) of the Rome Statute for the crimes against humanity of:

  • murder (article 7(l)(a));
  • deportation or forcible transfer (article 7(l)(d));
  • rape (article 7(l)(g));
  • persecution (articles 7(l)(h)); and
  • other inhumane acts (article 7(l)(k)).

End

——–

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

Felicien Kabuga: Where is he? The Rwanda Genocide never to be forgotten

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

The search for Felicien Kabuga is still on.

  Five million Dollars has been offered for any information that can lead to the capture of Kabuga. As the search continues, Kabuga lives comfortable hiding in a European country.

————

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN!

According to The STAR Online Kenya the man on the photo surfaces:

I’m not Kabuga, says man in Isiolo

Wednesday, 11 July 2012 00:02 BY HUSSEIN SALESA
 

 

WHO IS THIS?: Kabuga or Ngeera?WHO IS THIS?: Kabuga or Ngeera?

 

A 69 year old timber merchant in Isiolo Daniel Muthee Ngeera yesterday filed a complaint with the police alleging that the NTV and Daily Nation were using his photograph purporting it to be that of Rwandan genocide fugitive Felicien Kabuga. Ngeera has also instructed his lawyer to take legal proceedings against the media house. He said the use of his photo— in a blue shirt and black baseball cap—which the media house claimed was that of Kabuga, had put his life in danger as there was a Sh400 million bounty on the real Kabuga.

The elderly man refused to have his photo taken and he and his two sons chased away journalists who had gone to interview him. He claimed he had reported the matter to the Eastern provincial police boss Marcus Ocholla and also reported that his life was in danger.  According to an occurrence book seen by the Star, the old man claims that the news bulletins by NTV were likely to subject him to harassment by the security agents and had tainted his reputation and image as it portrayed him as a killer.

Ngeere said the photo in question was taken on March 22 this year at his Tree Mark timber yard in Isiolo. The retired Isiolo water officer who has lived and worked in the town for years was described by fellow traders as a hardworking and dedicated businessman who had contributed alot in the development of the town. Ngeere, who was born in Kibirichia in Meru town where his father owned a petrol station as well as other businesses, was deployed to Isiolo by the Ministry of Water where he worked until he retired a few years ago. He has made Isiolo his home.

Isiolo police boss Daniel Kamanza confirmed that the old man had filed a complaint with his office. He said Ngeere had a right to seek further redress through the courts. He however did not confirm whether the police will provide Ngeere with security following a complaint that a vehicle with an unknown number of people had camped overnight near his house at Water Estate in Isiolo. Yesterday, Ngeere and his two sons who help him at the timber yard closed the business early due to concerns about their safety.

Related article:

END

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

Female-led justice

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

Jury still out on impact of community mediation on women

KATHMANDU,  – Community mediation as an alternative to the formal justice system is gaining momentum in Nepal, revealing its successes and its shortcomings in a country without a constitution and an increasingly protracted transition out of a decade-long civil war.

A 2008 report by the Geneva-based NGO, International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), found many Nepalese living in “governance, law enforcement and justice vacuums – much more pronounced than in the period before the conflict”. 

The civil war between Maoist insurgents and the government killed almost 18,000 people between 1996 and 2006, according to recent government estimates.

“Disputants’ rights to a timely remedy are not being respected by the formal justice system,” said Frederick Rawski, the ICJ representative in Nepal. “This certainly has a role in affecting the support-seeking behaviour of communities.”

Procedural and managerial issues make the country’s justice system – which has only one court per district, or 75 in total – cumbersome, time-consuming and expensive. Official statistics list eight out of 10 people as living in remote areas, and 12 districts still have no access to roads.

Courts are virtually inaccessible to a large percentage of the country’s 27 million people, particularly the rural poor and the marginalized, said a 2009 US Agency for International Development (USAID) assessment of the rule of law in Nepal.

Nepal has a long history of traditional arbitration, and community mediation builds on this, said Mukti Rijal, of the Institute of Governance and Development, a Kathmandu-based NGO. Traditional village arbiters, at times seen as elitist, are being replaced by volunteer mediators.

“You now have mediators trained in negotiation, dispute resolution, and specializing in identifying the interests of disputing parties,” said Rijal. In the past decade, local NGOs, with the support of the UN Development Programme (UNDP) as well as the UK and Japanese governments, have helped establish community mediation services.

“We’re at the stage where cases and requests are coming in from neighbouring VDCs [village development committees, a unit of local government] where programmed mediation services are lacking,” said Sundeep Bista of the Access to Justice programme run by UNDP.

“We must recognize the cost impact of the courts on an individual,” said Ramesh Kumar Adhikari, Under-Secretary of the Ministry of Federal Affairs and Local Development. Nepal’s annual per capita income is less than US$650 while legal fees in Kathmandu, the capital, can cost up to $1100 per case.

Female-led justice

Community mediation programmes in dozens of village development committees are run by five donor agencies in Nepal, who usually require at least 30 percent of mediators to be women, and that members of marginalized ethnic groups such as Dalits, who are still widely viewed as an untouchable caste, are also included.

Less than 8 percent of registered legal professionals nationwide are women, according to 2009 data from the Nepal Bar Association. But as women mediators assume new leadership roles, they become trusted and respected members of the communities that may have ignored or shunned them.

“Women mediators are being selected by male disputants and are often the recipients of the Best Mediator awards [given by recently formed mediators’ societies] because communities are acknowledging that it’s the skills that are most important, not the sex or the caste,” said Rijal.

Usha Malla Pathak, 42, has practiced mediation in the capital region for the past 10 years. “While it can be a difficult job, when I am able to successfully bring two disputing parties together… the community is thankful to me for facilitating the transformation – this kind of social prestige cannot be purchased.”

Domestic violence

Domestic Violence in Nepal
View slideshow

Typical issues handled by community mediation include money and marital disputes, road and irrigation accessibility, theft, property inheritance and, increasingly, physical assault and domestic violence.

Taking a husband to court exposes a woman to family and community ostracism and can put their sole source of income at risk, said Rijal. The formal justice system is widely seen as patriarchal and an obstacle to enforcing women’s rights, the ICJ’s Rawski noted. Nepal has no dedicated family courts.

A recent report by the National Women’s Commission of Nepal pointed out that a 2008 Supreme Court ruling extending the statute of limitation on prosecuting marital rape beyond 35 days has yet to be implemented.

The national parliament disbanded in late May this year due to political disputes. Many laws await final passage or enactment, but the Domestic Violence and Punishment Act (2008) allows victims to seek justice through mediation.

“Court decisions are very difficult to implement,” said Rijal. “Community mediation is becoming popular because it’s an interest-based, win-win system.”

Risk of impunity

However, mediation – which does not seek prosecution – risks strengthening the impunity of people who perpetrate violence against women if police refuse to file a complaint and instead send them to mediation, said Kirti Thapa, of the Gender-Based Violence Unit at the Office of the Prime Minister and Council of Ministers.

More government oversight is needed to ensure mediation does not increase impunity in a country where “patriarchal values… are deeply entrenched”, according to a report on access to justice, funded by the UK Department for International Development ( DfID). In cases of gender-based violence, “even if the case is reported to the police, priority is given for settling it within the family or community before taking it further.”

Next steps

The 2011 Mediation Act seeks to expand mediation services, but Kumar Sharma Acharya, of the local Centre for Legal Research and Resource Development (CeLRRD), said more groundwork is needed.

“The Mediation Act 2011 is an umbrella act that focuses mainly on court-referred mediation. The only chapter on community mediation lacks sufficient procedural provisions.”

In 2012 CeLRRD conducted research on the effectiveness of court-referred and community mediation as opposed to formal justice. Acharya, an author of the report, cited a lack of political will to professionalize mediation, “reflected in the absence of a government agency directly responsible for its operational procedures and integration”.

Donors and the government have expressed concern about how long a volunteer-based initiative can last. The USAID assessment noted that mediation was intended to lighten the courts’ workload, but there is no clear evidence of it having shortened the waiting time for cases to be heard, or reducing the number of cases before the courts.

pa/pt/he source www.irinnews.org

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

What happens when opium is your cup of tea?

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

What happens when opium is your cup of tea?

BANGKOK, – Before opium, green tea was the cash crop of choice in Myanmar, and donors have tried for years to convince farmers to grow tea and other crops again. But these are less lucrative than opium poppies, the country’s highest-earning crop, and few growers have been persuaded.

“There are many challenges in persuading farmers to abandon poppy cultivation,” said Brian Agland, country director of Care International in Myanmar, an NGO that has worked with poppy growers since 2005.

Poppy seeds contain the crudest form of opium and bring in nine to 15 times more money per hectare than rice, says the most recent opium survey by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). 

When Care International started working with farmers in the northern Wa and Kokang special regions, it found that the poor soil and scant water for irrigation on the high slopes were sufficient for opium poppies, but little else, said Agland.

“In the early stages we faced many difficulties experimenting with agricultural crops in these remote harsher conditions. Rice and maize and tea are more labour intensive than poppies, and require expensive inputs such as fertilizers to cultivate and access to nearby markets.”

For the past decade, UNODC has tried to do the same with farmers in northeastern Shan State, who are responsible for 91 percent of Myanmar’s opium production.

The opium trade has long fuelled conflict in Myanmar, with armed groups cashing in on opium as their main source of income. Local media have reported continued clashes in parts of Shan State as recently as late June 2012, despite a ceasefire agreed in December 2011 between the government and one of the main armed groups.

Shan villagers told international media earlier in 2012 that they had lost money growing garlic, sugar and plants used in local cigarettes because there were fewer buyers and lower prices.

With support from the European Union and the Swiss and Norwegian governments, Care International instead tried tea. Agland noted that before the introduction of poppy seeds, tea had been the main cash crop in Wa and Kokang special regions for hundreds of years.

“Poppy farmers, like most farmers, are interested in the profit margin. In the opium industry, poppy farmers are at the bottom of the value-chain and sell their raw product at a low price to middlemen, who produce the opium and make most of the money.”

Persuading farmers that the long-term profits from non-poppy crops can bring in more cash than short-term poppy harvests is often the key to change. But there is little assurance farmers will not grow it again if they do not have access to loans, roads, technology, and markets, Jason Eligh, UNODC’s country manager in Myanmar, told IRIN in 2011.

For Care International, this meant combining “longer-term interventions with short-term activities such as food-for-work, income generation activities such as pig and chicken raising, home gardens, construction of rural roads, and school building”, said Agland. The NGO is preparing to start helping farmers export their tea.

Opium poppy cultivation in Myanmar increased by 14 percent in 2011, with an estimated US$275 million being paid to farmers, making it the world’s second largest opium poppy producer after Afghanistan.

fm/pt/he source www.irinnews.org

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

The downturn comes at a critical time in recovery efforts

Posted by African Press International on July 9, 2012

The downturn comes at a critical time in recovery efforts

COLOMBO,  – Donor assistance is waning in northern Sri Lanka, where the critical priorities of food, shelter, protection and nutrition are not being covered, and many displaced people still need outside assistance more than three years after a decades-long civil war ended.

“We’re now at a critical juncture in time,” Vincent Lelei, head of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (OCHA) told IRIN in the capital, Colombo. “It’s imperative that donors remain engaged if we are to ensure the valuable gains that have already been achieved.”

Of the US$147 million requested under the Joint Plan for Assistance (JPA) for Northern Province 2012, launched by the UN and its humanitarian partners on 21 January, just 17.5 percent had been funded by 6 July – a gap of nearly $122 million. Those in need have yet to realize durable solutions and will continue to need assistance, the UN warned.

According to the UN Financial Tracking Service (FTS), a global, real-time database that records all reported international humanitarian aid (including that of NGOs, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement, bilateral aid, in-kind aid, and private donations), significant gaps exist in the areas of shelter, livelihoods and demining.

“Some areas have not received any funding at all,” Lelei noted. Of the $5 million requested for water and sanitation (WASH), and $29 million requested for mine action, donors have yet to come forward, while a request of almost $40 million for shelter and permanent housing assistance faces a shortfall of more than 70 percent.

“Despite strong commitment from Aus Aid, the European Union, and India, there… [are] huge outstanding shelter needs in the north,” said David Evans, chief technical advisor at the United Nations Human Settlements Programme.

The World Food Programme (WFP) has been providing assistance to some 300,000 men, women and children in the north, but “WFP is facing significant funding constraints, which means that hard decisions will have to be made in terms of operational downsizing,” Paulette Jones, a spokeswoman for the agency, warned.

“Serious pipeline breaks of pulses, sugar, oil and fortified cereals are anticipated shortly, with similar pipeline breaks for rice also anticipated. As a regrettable measure of last resort, WFP may even have to reduce rations to our beneficiaries, unless urgent donor funding is forthcoming,” Jones said.

Most UN agencies told IRIN they had already begun scaling back their operations and consolidating their field offices – a trend likely to continue through 2013. The World Bank now refers to Sri Lanka as a “middle income country at peace”, and donors are looking to spend their money on what they regard as more pressing humanitarian emergencies.

NGOs struggle more


Photo: Contributor/IRIN
Thousands of conflict-displaced have returned to the north

The situation for the 32 international NGOs working in the north is even more dire. “There really is no funding available – it’s drying up at the source and we’re all suffering,” said Jose Ravano, the country director of Save the Children in Sri Lanka. “What funding is coming in is directed to the UN, so for us it’s even harder.”

Aid workers confirmed that many NGOs have already had to reduce programme activities and the number of internationally recruited staff.

Funding constraints forced an international demining NGO in Jaffna to lay off 200 local deminers in May, but according to the UN Development Programme, 122 square kilometres of land remain contaminated, including 18 months of priority mine clearance, which prevents many displaced from returning to their homes to restart their livelihoods.

NGOs also continue to face a number of administrative challenges, including the renewal of visas and the approval of projects – a problem many feel is a result of the government’s long-standing suspicion of NGOs during the war years.

International NGOs have the highest presence in areas where internally displaced persons (IDPs) have returned most recently, clearly showing that they are still engaged in humanitarian response priorities.

According to the UN, more than 445,000 people displaced by the conflict have returned to Sri Lanka’s Northern and Eastern provinces. This includes some 229,227 people displaced after April 2008, when renewed fighting broke out, and 215,985 persons displaced before April 2008.

Some 6,000 IDPs who fled after April 2008 are in camps – the vast majority in Menik Farm outside the northern town of Vavuniya – awaiting return to their areas of origin. An additional 7,300 from the protracted caseload (displaced before April 2008), remain in government welfare centres in Jaffna and Vavuniya districts.

“It’s vital the international community stays the course,” OCHA’s Lelei urged. “So that those affected by the conflict and war witness first hand the benefits of promotion of reconciliation and peace.”

ds/he
source www.irinnews.org

Posted in AA > News and News analysis | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: