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Archive for January 31st, 2007

Statistics on viewer development today by 23.59

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

Country Share
Country ShareContinent Share
Continent Share

Figure nr 1. shows viewers in percentage pr country by today at 23.59

Figure nr 2. shows viewers in percentage pr continent by today at 23.59

We update the statistics now and then.

By Statistics section

African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no

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Alcohol hangover and symptoms

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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People who consume alcohol to intoxication often experience what is known as a hangover. Hangovers result in unpleasant physical and mental symptoms including fatigue, headache, dizziness, and vertigo.

While there are some suggested treatments to curb the effects of hangover, the best way to prevent a hangover from occurring is not to consume alcohol. Since the effects of most hangovers subside after 8 to 24 hours, time is the most effective remedy for alcohol hangover symptoms.

Alcohol Hangover

Hangovers are a frequent, though unpleasant, experience among people who drink to intoxication. Despite the prevalence of hangovers, however, this condition is not well understood scientifically.

Multiple possible contributors to the hangover state have been investigated, and researchers have produced evidence that alcohol can directly promote hangover symptoms through its effects on urine production, the gastrointestinal tract, blood sugar concentrations, sleep patterns, and biological rhythms.

In addition, researchers postulate that effects related to alcohol’s absence after a drinking bout (i.e., withdrawal), alcohol metabolism, and other factors (e.g., biologically active, nonalcohol compounds in beverages; the use of other drugs; certain personality traits; and a family history of alcoholism) also may contribute to the hangover condition. Few of the treatments commonly described for hangover have undergone scientific evaluation.

What Is a Hangover?

A hangover is characterized by the constellation of unpleasant physical and mental symptoms that occur after a bout of heavy alcohol drinking. Physical symptoms of a hangover include fatigue, headache, increased sensitivity to light and sound, redness of the eyes, muscle aches, and thirst.

Signs of increased sympathetic nervous system activity can accompany a hangover, including increased systolic blood pressure, rapid heartbeat (i.e., tachycardia), tremor, and sweating. Mental symptoms include dizziness; a sense of the room spinning (i.e., vertigo); and possible cognitive and mood disturbances, especially depression, anxiety, and irritability.

Symptoms of Hangover

Class of Symptoms Type
Constitutional Fatigue, weakness, and thirst
Pain Headache and muscle aches
Gastrointestinal Nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Sleep and biological rhythms Decreased sleep, decreased REM(rapid eye movements), and increased slow-wave sleep.

Sensory Vertigo and sensitivity to light and sound. Cognitive Decreased attention and concentration.
Mood Depression, anxiety, and irritability
Sympathetic hyperactivity Tremor, sweating, and increased pulse and systolic blood pressure

The particular set of symptoms experienced and their intensity may vary from person to person and from occasion to occasion. In addition, hangover characteristics may depend on the type of alcoholic beverage consumed and the amount a person drinks.

Typically, a hangover begins within several hours after the cessation of drinking, when a person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is falling. Symptoms usually peak about the time BAC is zero and may continue for up to 24 hours thereafter.

Overlap exists between hangover and the symptoms of mild alcohol withdrawal (AW), leading to the assertion that hangover is a manifestation of mild withdrawal. Hangovers, however, may occur after a single bout of drinking, whereas withdrawal occurs usually after multiple, repeated bouts.

Other differences between hangover and AW include a shorter period of impairment (i.e., hours for hangover versus several days for withdrawal) and a lack of hallucinations and seizures in hangover.

People experiencing a hangover feel ill and impaired. Although a hangover may impair task performance and thereby increase the risk of injury, equivocal data exist on whether hangover actually impairs complex mental tasks.

By Longstory/Cutshort

Lifted&Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99739

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Statistics on viewer development today by 11.30

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

Country Share
Country ShareContinent Share
Continent Share

Figure nr 1. shows viewers in percentage pr country by today at 11.30

Figure nr 2. shows viewers in percentage pr continent by today at 11.30

We update the statistics now and then.

By Statistics section

African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no

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“…. the recent debate has been healthy for the Kenyan Society, even though sad for the Maggero family”, writes Nyquist

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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You are not alone in suffering from these problems.

Also Norwegians and swedes experience the same. The only difference, is that Norwegians and swedes have a greater number of people to chose their friends from.

If you notice that someone is jealous or try to put you down, you just turn your back to them and focus on people having a positive affect on your life.

This is so much harder for Kenyans and others that are a minority in our society. It’s therefore very important to find common grounds and simply divert from issues that divides you.

People will always disagree, but what’s wrong in that? Just agree to disagree and stay civilized. There’s no need for name-calling or demeaning comments.

Discussions are seldom a negative thing, but the way people discuss and argue can be very negative.

Everywhere, where there’s progress there’s friction from people disagreeing. Those disagreements are often the source and reason for progress.

I think that the recent debate has been healthy for the Kenyan Society, even though sad for the Maggero family.

However, it’s good that the “grass-roots” now has started to raise their voice. Hopefully, this will be the start of a stronger Kenyan Society where Kenyan and Scandinavian culture can unify.

Remember that many Kenyans in Scandinavia today, are of 2’nd and even 3’rd generation immigrants.

Being a Norwegian living outside Norway, I know how easy it is to exaggerate your patriotism and cultural identity. It is definitely healthy to remember where you come from, as long as it does not prevent you from adjusting to your new country.

It’s very confusing for a young person, when the parents and other authority persons are busy fighting the cultural influence from the country where they actually stay.

Instead, let’s all embrace and respect each other’s cultures. This also applies to Kenyans of different tribal origin. Tribalism and racism should not be allowed in our society.

Finally, I want to encourage all Kenyans – young & old, liberated or not – to speak up and take part in building the new Kenyan Society. Together, we are strong…

By Lars Nyquist

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Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739

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Kibera slums, densely populated, is in Raila Odinga’s Langata constituency

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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BBC reports that, “about 600,000 people in Kenya’s capital live in the Kibera slums, East Africa’s largest informal settlement.”

 

This is a slum in the Langata constituency represented by Raila Odinga who is now running for the presidency in Kenya.

The new world boss, “UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has been to the slum on his first visit to Africa, assessing challenges the UN faces in trying to reduce poverty.”

Raila has represented the area for many years now. It must have become difficult for him to make changes in the area because, “congestion is a major problem. There is not even the space to build toilets.”

To live in an area without toilets must be the most difficult thing because diseases thrive well under such circumstances. “Some frustrated residents use polythene bags commonly known as “flying toilets” to dispose of human waste.”

It is not known what steps Raila will take to change the lives of the people in the area if elected president, because the people of Kibera are faced with health hazards everyday. 

By Korir,

Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel. +47 932 99 739, source.bbc

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“Norway’s royal women put on their ethnic dress”, reports aftenposten

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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Royals pose for the holidays

Norway’s royal women put on their best ethnic dress and posed for holiday photos along with other family members this week. From right: Crown Princess Mette-Marit holding Prince Sverre Magnus, her son Marius (standing in red vest), Crown Prince Haakon holding Princess Ingrid Alexandra, King Harald, Queen Sonja and Princess Märtha Louise holding daughters Leah Isadora and Maud Angelica. Märtha Louise’s husband Ari Behn was busy selling and autographing his new book in local shopping centers when the photos were shot at Oslo Royal Palace.

PHOTO: LISE ÅSERUD

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Surprising Ari Behn, the husband of Princess Martha Louise chose to be absent and instead gave preference to be in a bookstore to sell his book.

Lifted and published by African Press in Norway, apn, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739

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Castro’s health improving as he fights on to survive

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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Fidel Castro

<Mr Castro struggles on.

BBC reports that the “Cuban television has shown its first pictures for three months of ailing leader Fidel Castro. Mr Castro, 80, was seen standing during a meeting with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, which was said to have taken place on Monday.”

Many had started to write him off , but the Cuban leader is not ready to go. “He appeared frail but stronger than three months ago.”

Since his health stopped him from his presidential duties, “Mr Castro has not been seen in public since undergoing gastric surgery in July, prompting speculation that he has cancer or is terminally ill.”

By Korir,

Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.bbc

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Norway: “Rescue crews found Jonny Roger Seem after he’d been missing for nearly three days in the mountain”, according to aftenposten

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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Rescue crews found Jonny Roger Seem after he’d been missing for nearly three days in the mountains.

PHOTO: Ludvig Killingberg jr. / Scanpix


All of Seem’s dogs survived the harrowing experience in the mountains as well.

PHOTO: Ludvig Killingberg jr. / SCANPIX

*”A 41-year-old Norwegian was thanking his dogs for helping him survive outdoors for nearly three harrowing days, after getting lost in the mountains during a violent snow storm.

Jonny Roger Seem was also deeply grateful for the massive search and rescue operation that went on most of the weekend. But he believes it was his team of dogs that saved his life.

“The weather was so bad that they simply laid down (in the snow), as if they were saying ‘here’s where we’re camping,’ and then their driver just had to do the same,” Seem told Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK) after rescue crews finally found him and his 12 dogs late Saturday night.

“They were the sensible ones, when I wanted to keep going.”

Seem could initially send out calls for help from his mobile phone on Thursday, but its battery eventually wore out and police, military and volunteer rescue crews had no contact with him from late Friday afternoon. The search had to be called off Friday night because of the storm and lack of visibility.

Seem is an experienced dog-sledder and had set off on a route between Sunndal and Oppdal in the mountains of central Norway. The search was concentrated in an area of Møre og Romsdal just east of Sunndalsøra.

Seem said he could often hear scooters but didn’t manage to make contact. A helicopter that joined the search had to turn back because of the weather. So Seem had little choice but to gather his dogs around him and lie in his sled with a blanket over him while he waited for help. He said he was freezing the entire time.

“I had on normal touring clothes, but they were quite wet,” he said. He realized he needed to stay calm with his dogs. He said his relief at being found was indescribable.

Rescue crews said Seem was in amazingly good shape when he turned on his headlamp to attract the attention of a search team he could hear close by. He was taken to a nearby hospital but doctors couldn’t find any visible injuries. His dogs were also in good shape and all but two were able to trot back down the mountain themselves.

“I really want to thank all those who joined the search, they did a great job,” Seem said. “And I apologize to all the skiers who didn’t get their slopes groomed this weekend, because all the preparation machines were being used to look for me.”*

By Nina Berglund

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Lifted and published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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Norway: “Now that I see the consequences I truly regret doing it”, reports aftenposten

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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*”Ingvild Engesland didn’t expect much attention from her nude spread in Lek magazine.

PHOTO: LEK 

Norwegian skier Ingvild Engesland, 22, deeply regrets posing nude for soft porn magazine Lek, and is surprised by how much attention it generated. 

“I thought it wasn’t anything to worry about, there are pictures of naked girls in that magazine every month without it causing any fuss,” Engesland said.

The next issue features ten photos of her, some pornographic. She no longer thinks the job was just a laugh.

The magazine presents her as a “sexy sports talent” and skiing star, and Norwegian newspapers and television stations swamped her with requests to meet the sexually liberated girl portrayed in the article.

“This is just terrible. I never got to check the interview and I still haven’t seen it. But I have heard some excerpts and I don’t recognize myself,” Engesland said.

Engesland is a promising athlete and has a 10th place in the Norwegian championship and a fifth place in the world Under-23s as her best results so far. The Norwegian media didn’t notice then, but her nude spread has now caught their attention.

“I am very surprised that there has been so much fuss, I am not famous at all. Now that I see the consequences I truly regret doing it,” Engesland said, and looks forward to it blowing over quickly.

“I want to be remembered as a skier. I have had injury trouble this autumn but am ready for the season debut at the Norwegian Cup in a week and a half,” Engesland said.”*

By Stein Erik Kirkebøen and Jonathan Tisdall

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Lifted and published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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Norway: “The hair from reindeer seems effective at cleaning up oil spills”, writes aftenposten

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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Norwegian reindeer may have some synergy with oil.

PHOTO: Rapp, Ole Magnus


The hair from reindeer seems effective at cleaning up oil spills.

PHOTO: ERIK VEIGÅRD/SCANPIX

*”Reindeer owners may be able to derive a new income source from their herds, by peddling the hair from their animals for use in oil spill clean-up.

Hair from reindeer, it seems, can offer an efficient means of getting oil out of the water. To get enough reindeer hair, the animals may literally be vacuumed.

It sounds like a fanciful project, but former reindeer owner Per Tor Turi of Karasjok in northern Norway has been working on it for years.

He’s had help from Norwegian research agency Sintef in Trondheim, which suggests that hair from reindeer has the right qualities to collect oil clumps.

“I’ve experimented with hair and oil both in the bathtub, on lakes and in streams,” Turi told newspaper Aftenposten. “After a few hours, clumps of hair and oil were easy to pick up.”

He notes that reindeer hair also is a natural product, unlike chemicals often used in oil spill clean-up at present.

Turi has also come up with an idea for gathering enough reindeer hair. He notes that reindeer shed much of their winter coats in the spring. “So I see the possibility of using special vacuum cleaners where reindeer gather, like in corrals in the spring,” he said.

“We must also remember that around 60,000 reindeer are butchered in Finnmark every year,” he said. “We’re working with special enzymes that loosen hair from the skins without damaging the skins.”

Researcher Svein Ramstad, who works in Sintef’s department of marine environmental technology, thinks Turi has a good idea, and that Sintef will gladly conduct more experiments if Turi wants to move forward with the project.

By Ole Magnus Rapp and Nina Berglund

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Lifted and Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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Norway: “Working for Queen Sonja, claims a former chief chambermaid, was simply too tough”, writes aftenposten.

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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*”Six people are employed to help Queen Sonja look “correct” in both public and private situations.

PHOTO: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / SCANPIX 

Just as a major personnel conflict is playing out within orway’s largest union organization, another one has hit Oslo’s Royal Palace. Working for Queen Sonja, claims a former chief chambermaid, was simply too tough.It’s apparently more than full-time job to keep Queen Sonja looking stylish at all times. The woman who was in charge of the queen’s so-called “chamber service” (kammertjeneste) has told newspaper VG that she was forced to break Norwegian labour laws by working far too much overtime.

Sidsel Wiborg, age 57, worked for Queen Sonja for nearly six years before going out on sick leave last spring.

“For a long time, it was too tough to meet the demands (of the job),” she told VG on Tuesday. “I have tried to get more resources allocated to the chamber service, but was pressured into a situation where I haven’t been able to follow labour laws with regard to overtime.”

She wouldn’t say how much overtime she worked, but VG claimed it had reason to believe it amounted to as many as 600 hours a year.

Wiborg told VG on Monday that she now has lost her job, without being told why. Palace officials won’t discuss the conflict with Wiborg, and the queen is currently on a family holiday in the Caribbean.

‘Special’ workforce
Palace spokesman Sven Gjeruldsen told VG on Tuesday, however, that labour laws occasionally have been “a challenge” for such a “special” workforce as the Royal Court. He claimed, though, that palace officials have addressed the challenge over the past two years “in close cooperation with the employees.”

Gjeruldsen refused to reveal the results of a survey of the workplace conducted in 2005, nor would employee representatives discuss it. VG reported, however, that working conditions were criticized by palace staff. Gjeruldsen claimed steps have been taken to follow up on any problems.

Queen Sonja’s chamber service now consists of six persons, including a leader, two chambermaids, two seamstresses and a hair dresser. Their job is to make sure the nearly 70-year-old queen is looking “correct” on all official and private occasions.

VG reported that several palace employees have expressed sympathy for Wiborg, but none was willing to be identified.*”

By Nina Berglund

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Lifted and published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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Norway: “Employees at the palace must sign contracts vowing not to express their personal opinions about the royals”, according to Aftenposten.

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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“*The palace is reportedly a tough place to work.PHOTO: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / SCANPIX

Employees at the palace must sign contracts vowing not to express their personal opinions about the royals, and they cannot keep diary notes that mention the royal family.

The standard contract for palace workers also prevents staff from sharing their opinions of their royal employers, newspaper VG reports, quoting from a received copy of the contract.

A sampling of law professors believe the contract restricts basic freedom of expression.

Stig Åkenes Johnsen is a labor lawyer, and told VG he believes some of the points conflict with both the Constitution and the Working Environment Act. One example is the right to discuss information related to harassment in the workplace.

Professor Carl August Fleischer rated the contract as being too imprecise and said that everyone had to have the right to protect their essential requirements.

VG reported earlier this week that Queen Sonja’s head of valet service had been removed from her position. Wiborg, who is still in the employ of the palace, has been off sick for ten months and claimed she had not been given a reason for her loss of position.

Wiborg’s duty is to ensure that Queen Sonja is properly attired for all occasions. Wiborg has claimed the job was too tough, and that she had to work illegally long hours to accomplish her duties.*”

By Kristin Grøntoft and Jonathan Tisdall

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Lifted and published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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Kenya: “The last word in Anglo Leasing scandal has not been spoken”, writes Dr Karanja.

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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My Photo

<Written by Dr. Stephen Kabera Karanja. Lifted from his Blogspot. For more on corruption visit the site.

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The last word in Anglo Leasing scandal has not been spoken, to borrow a Norwegian expression. The exoneration of cabinet minister Kiraitu Murungi, former cabinet minister David Mwiraria and Vice President Moody Awori by the Kenya Anticorruption Commission (KACC) and the Attorney General (AG) from any wrong doing does not bring a closure to the scandal. But it has produced winners and losers in the saga.

The investigations were triggered into action by claims of the runaway former Ethics and Governance PS Mr John Githongo. The AG closed the files on 15 January 2007 on recommendation by the KACC. As the Anglo Leasing case has attracted high political, public and international interest the action by the Kenyan legal institutions was received with mixed emotions. There are those who feel that the institutions have short-circuited the public and the war on corruption and those who regard the action as a victory of rule of law.

The winners in the saga are the suspects, President Kibaki and his government and the legal institutions and rule of law. On the losers’ side are Githongo, opposition politicians and Kenyan people and the war on corruption.

The biggest winners are the suspected persons for being exonerated and being given a new political lease of life. Those who had stepped aside from their ministerial positions can now hope to rejoin the government, and those in the government already will feel vindicated from any wrongdoing. For them this is a triumph of rule of law. Their innocence has been vindicated.

The other winner is Kibaki and his government. His close and loyal lieutenants have been cleared of crime by “independent and impartial” legal institutions. This is especially a triumph for Kibaki because he has all along insisted for concrete evidence before asking him to take any political action such as sacking his cabinet ministers. We can remember that allowing the resignation of his cabinet ministers was not his initiative but was imposed on him by demands from the opposition and the public. Kibaki and his government may regard this a victory of rule of law unless any impropriety and interference with the independence and impartiality of the investigating institutions can be rightly imputed and demonstrated against them. It is also a victory for them against those who have accused Kibaki and his government of inaction. Especially, it is a blow to Githongo’s claim that the President did not heed his (Githongo’s) advice. The president did not have to do no more than direct the allegations to be investigated and allow the relevant institutions to carry out their work without interference.

KACC especially has been accused for lack of impartiality in the Anglo Leasing cases affecting current government officials. It must have been a difficult decision for the Director, Aaron Ringera to dismiss allegations against his former colleague and legal partner Kiraitu Murungi knowing this could be used against the KACC. That Ringera did this is a bold decision and measures to his no nonsense man character. It was also a daring action by the AG, who is allegedly implicated in the scandal, to accept recommendation to close the cases by the KACC. The two institutions were walking on a tight political and legal balancing rope. For them, they are winners for upholding the law and rule of law instead of popular political expedience as demanded by the public, media and opposition. It is a triumph for democratic and legal institutions against mob justice and trial by the media.

The rule of law is also a winner. In criminal law, Blackstone’s formulation (also known as Blackstone’s ratio or the Blackstone ratio) is the principle that it is “better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer”. Commenting on the principle the Wekipidia says that “as a principle of justice, the imperative that the innocent not be abused by the system was generally considered self-evident during the enlightenment era, or any other time liberty was a significant force. Authoritarian governments, on the other hand, tend to lean toward erring on the side of punishment, lest any guilty man escape.” It is imperative that the law always guides legal institutions even as public interests are considered. The institutions have a duty to make sure that the guilty person is punished and not the innocent. That is the basis of the cardinal legal principle of the presumption of innocence in criminal trials. In legal matters, there is no room for mob justice. For any unbiased legal mind, the Githongo evidence against Anglo Leasing suspects was lacking. It could not sustain a conviction beyond reasonable doubt. The Law Society of Kenya chairman, Mr Tom Ojienda, has defended KACC saying the evidence produced by Githongo could not secure a conviction. Even before taking a matter to court, it is the duty of the prosecution to ascertain that the evidence relied on establishes a prima facie case. That is, the evidence must be adequate to put the accused person on his or her defence.

Githongo is among the losers in the saga. His allegations against the suspects did not stand the scrutiny of law according to the investigators and the prosecution. It could not establish a prima facie case. This is not to say that a crime was not committed. Githongo has also asserted this in a press statement the Standard 21 January 2007. The question for the investigators and prosecution was did the suspects commit the crime alleged? Were the suspects the culprits? The problem with Githongo’s evidence is that it is based on a conspiracy theory, which alleges that the suspects were hindering investigation on the matter. This could have arisen because he mixed roles. He absconded his legal role of an advisor to the president and instead embarked on self-imposed role of an investigator. In the circumstances, he did not give the institutions endowed with that role time to do their work. As an investigator, he also become the prosecutor and the judge. He fed the President and the public with a conspiracy theory and not concrete evidence. Now Githongo says that Kenyans will soon know the truth on Anglo Leasing contracts. Did he withhold any useful information from the investigators and the public? Was there more facts and evidence than in his report to the President and the public? If that is the case, then he has not been truthful. He is part of the cover-up.

The opposition politicians are also losers. They backed Githongo allegations blindly. They have been demonising the only democratic and legal institution with the competence to investigate the scandal instead of supporting and nurturing them. Political bias has also meant that vengeance rather than justice, drove the politicians. They were more concerned with ouster of the suspects from the government and weakening the authority of the President rather than the proper investigation of the scandal.

But the greatest losers in the saga are the people of Kenya and the war against corruption. The guilty have not been brought to book. They are out there enjoying their ill-gotten wealth. A good advice to Githongo is that, if he has nothing useful to add to the investigations, he should shut up and let Ringera (KACC) and Wako (AG) get the guilty. If they fail, they will be held accountable and not Githongo.

In conclusion, the lesson to learn from the whole saga is that the politicians, the media and the public should put their faith and trust in institutions and not individuals. Now, the focus is on the KACC and the Office of the AG to thoroughly investigate the Anglo Leasing scandal and prosecute those implicated by the evidence. At the end, the nation and the people will hold the two institutions accountable. Meanwhile, there should be no interference with their work from whatever quarters.

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Lifted and Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739

Source.http://killcoruption.blogspot.com/

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Where are the troops from countries like South Africa and Libya?

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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BBC reports that, “African Union leaders have failed to secure full numbers for a planned peacekeeping force in Somalia, following a two-day summit in Ethiopia.”

It now means it might become Somalia’s own problem to secure the much needed security in their country. “Speaking at the closure, new AU chairman John Kufuor said several nations had pledged troops – but only 4,000 out of a required 8,000. The force is due to replace withdrawing Ethiopian soldiers, whose intervention swept Islamists from power last month.”

It is a good sign that the Somali leaders are willing to settle their own difference now that, “Somalia’s leader has agreed to host a reconciliation conference.”

Other African countries should contribute the needed troops. “At the start of the meeting in Addis Adaba, 4,000 troops were committed by Uganda, Nigeria, Ghana and Malawi.”

Where are the troops from countries like South Africa and Libya? 

By Korir,

Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.bbc

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“Norwegian snowboarding star Terje Håkonsen is caught in a conflict with some neighbours in Oslo”, according to Aftenposten.

Posted by African Press International on January 31, 2007

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Snowboarder Terje Håkonsen’s skating ramp, lower left, has sparked complaints.

PHOTO: HANNE MELLINGSÆTER


Terje Håkonsen has been ordered to tear down the skating ramp he built in his backyard.

PHOTO: JAN-MORTEN BJØRNBAKK/SCANPIX

“*Norwegian snowboarding star Terje Håkonsen is caught in a conflict with some neighbours in Oslo, who don’t like a skating ramp he built in his backyard. 

At least one neighbour, downhill skiing star Kjetil André Aamodt, claims he doesn’t mind the ramp. Aamodt lives next door to Håkonsen on the exclusive Bygdøy peninsula, where some of Oslo’s wealthiest residents live in stylish surroundings.

“I haven’t been bothered by the ramp, and we’re good neighbours,” Aamodt told newspaper Aften. “But it is important for us here that everyone follows the laws and the rules.”

Other neighbours claim that Håkonsen hasn’t, by building the ramp without asking for or receiving the city’s permission.

The conflict started last summer, when neighbour Knut von Krogh complained in a letter to city officials that he was amazed the city had allowed construction of such a large ramp along the fjord on Admiral Børresens Way.

It turned out that the city hadn’t allowed any such thing, and that Håkonsen had built it without the necessary permit. He apologized to the city planning department and subsequently sent in a permit application.

His application was rejected on December 19 for lack of proper documentation. The city hasn’t heard anything more from Håkonsen, and Chris Hartmann of the planning department says the ramp now must be torn down by April 15.

Håkonsen, busy with planning The Arctic Challenge snowboarding competition at Midstuen in Oslo, wasn’t available for comment.*”

By Nina Berglund

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Lifted and Published by African Press in Norway, APN, africanpress@chello.no, tel +47 932 99 739, source.aftenpostenENG

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